BodyInMind

BodyInMind looks at the relationship between the body, the brain and the mind and how they interact particularly in chronic and complex pain disorders.

Left right judgement task performance – more than the body schema

Sometimes very simple tasks are more complicated than we imagine.  An example is the Left Right Judgement Task (LRJT). In this task individuals are shown images of body parts and they must decide if the image is of the left or right side of the body (or if it is turned to the left or right for the low back and neck). Often individuals with … [Read more...]

Is chronic widespread pain passed down from parents to children? 

Nearly everyone experiences pain that is felt in the bones, joints, muscles, tendons, or ligaments at some point – commonly termed ‘musculoskeletal pain’. For example, 80-90% of people experience low back pain at some point in their life, with approximately one in three reporting chronic (or long-lasting) symptoms [1]. Chronic musculoskeletal … [Read more...]

Do people with chronic pain have altered motor imagery?

The left/right judgement task (LRJT) is a common method of assessing motor imagery performance. The LRJT  involves viewing images of a hand or foot [1], for example, and determining whether the image belongs to the left or right side of the body. This determination is done implicitly meaning that we make an initial judgement then mentally position … [Read more...]

Should I stay or should I go? When goals conflict in the context of pain

Why is it that some individuals with chronic pain stay fairly active, and others are not? Why do individuals act the way they do? One possible answer to both questions might be motivation. Imagine being an individual suffering from chronic pain. When you experience pain, it may push you to pursue or avoid activities in order to control pain or … [Read more...]

Prickly issues: The biopsychosociality of pain might not necessarily mean biopsychosocial treatments work. 

A little while ago now*, O’Keeffe et al published a systematic review and meta-analysis that showed little difference in effect between treatments they described as physical, psychological or combined. The paper was vigorously criticised by Robert Gatchel—of functional restoration fame—and John Licciardone, who run a combined all-on-one-site … [Read more...]

Lifestyle behaviour change with chronic pain isn’t a piece of cake

Chronic pain and other chronic health issues appear to have considerable links. For example, data published by the Australia Institute of Health and Welfare show 64.5% of people with chronic back problems also report another chronic condition, such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. One hypothesis for why … [Read more...]

The MultiDimensional Symptom Index: A New Tool for Rapid Phenotyping of People in Pain

I like to measure things. I mean, I really like to measure things. Not entirely sure where that comes from, possibly my love of The Count on Sesame Street during my younger days, or possibly stemming from my philosophical positions on the nature of knowledge and reality:  I believe that any exploration of natural events that includes a … [Read more...]

A national initiative to advance pain education across Canadian physiotherapy programs

Integrating best evidence on pain management within the entry-level training of healthcare professionals is arguably one of the most comprehensive and effective ways of closing the knowledge-to-practice gap within our field. This, however, is no simple feat. One important challenge is that there are a multitude of factors and invested stakeholders … [Read more...]

Balancing confidence and compassion when responding to children’s chronic pain

A diagnosis of chronic pain is not a milestone that parents and young people plan for. Similarly, knowing how to effectively respond to and care for a child who is experiencing pain that sticks around for longer than anticipated is not part of most parents’ parenting toolkit. Thus, parenting a child with chronic is pain is uniquely difficult- not … [Read more...]

Are Modic changes associated with low back pain?

About thirty years ago, de Roos et al. [1] found some signal changes in the endplates of the lumbar vertebra on MRI that had not been described in the literature before. Dr. Modic and his group picked up on the findings and described them further, classifying them into three distinct types, Type 1, Type 2 and Type 3. [2, 3] These first papers were … [Read more...]