Lorimer welcomes you to the Pain Revolution

A few years ago, I was sitting in a conference listening to what was pretty cool science. I remember thinking ‘this is a nice little development’. I looked around the theatre. I recognised faces – eminent scientists and promising early career researchers; experts of this and that. Then it struck me: these meetings can be great for our collective … [Read more...]

Explaining Pain for Acute Back Pain – reflections on Traeger et al. part 2

4. Why am I excited? First up, one of the great liberators of being a scientist is that we are not just permitted to change our minds, we are actually required to do so when the data say so. The Very Excellent Kevin Vowles uses the phrase ‘dance to the data’ and I like it. So, I have changed my mind about the likely benefit of just adding a two … [Read more...]

Explaining Pain for Acute Back Pain – reflections on Traeger et al. part 1

The PREVENT trial published recently in JAMA Neurology seems to have created a storm. If  views and tweets and general social noise are your metric, then this one weighs in pretty well – over 15K views and altmetric score passing 260 inside a week. But if impact on the community and likelihood to move the field forward is more your thing, then this … [Read more...]

Pain after cancer. Let’s take it on.

Here’s an observation of two very different research fields: cancer and pain science education. Take cancer - truly gobsmacking investment in research and treatment globally has seen remarkable improvements in outcomes. Based on UK data, survival rates have doubled since 1970 and for some common cancers, they have quadrupled or more. Now take pain … [Read more...]

Some good news for America’s Back Pain Problem?

A couple of weeks ago, I had a mock interview for a new research fellowship with our national research council. In my rather sheltered life, these interviews are a rather big deal – whether or not I am to remain a government-funded medical researcher hangs on the line and the chances are intimidatingly thin. The mock interview then, aims to give … [Read more...]

What about congenital insensitivity to pain?

We had a question recently from Mensah Y Amedzo who asked: Hi Lorimer, with regards to this statement “nociception is neither sufficient nor necessary for pain” how do you explain the fact that people with Congenital Insensitivity to Pain never experience pain even though other sensations are intact and they obviously have a brain. They don’t … [Read more...]

Reductionism vs The Big Picture – can we have our kayak and heat it too?

I am down on sleep and have penned a rather personal post, because right now, on the back of some outstanding conversations with some truly impressive newly ‘graduating’ Anaesthetic and Pain Medicine fellows*, it seems an important reflection to share. Yesterday I caught up with my good mate Jono.  Conversation with Jono is always rewarding. He … [Read more...]

6 Ways We’re Helping Persisting Pain in Rural Australia

The journey from southern Australia from Melbourne to Adelaide has begun and is now in its second day. Check out the daily happenings and in the meantime this is a reminder of why cyclists are riding nearly 900km this week: The contribution of rural Australia cannot be underestimated. For a long time, we rode “on the sheep’s back” and nowadays … [Read more...]

Bring on the Pain Revolution!

When it comes to health, rural communities take more than their fair share of the burden of disease and disability. Chronic pain is no exception to this rule – stats would suggest that these problems are bigger in rural communities than they are in the cities. The prevalence of persistent disabling pain, pain-related opioid dependency and … [Read more...]

Oldies but Goodies – Everything you wanted to know about CENTRAL SENSITISATION

Over this holiday season we are posting the most read articles from the last five years.  The third is a BiM review of a J Pain paper by Alban Latremoliere and Clifford J. Woolf (AKA L&W) Everything you wanted to know about CENTRAL SENSITISATION By Kerwin Talbot & Lorimer Moseley Another of our series on the Journal of Pain’s most … [Read more...]