Oldies but Goodies – Everything you wanted to know about CENTRAL SENSITISATION

Over this holiday season we are posting the most read articles from the last five years.  The third is a BiM review of a J Pain paper by Alban Latremoliere and Clifford J. Woolf (AKA L&W) Everything you wanted to know about CENTRAL SENSITISATION By Kerwin Talbot & Lorimer Moseley Another of our series on the Journal of Pain’s most … [Read more...]

What to call the amplification of nociceptive signals in the CNS that contribute to widespread pain?

Clifford Woolf, who some may know as the ‘father of central sensitisation’, recently wrote a commentary to PAIN.[1] It piqued our interest because it was about the use of the term ‘central sensitisation’, and we suspect we know people who’d insist that the term ‘central sensitisation’ should only be used to describe changes at the dorsal horn, and … [Read more...]

Change what you think, change what you feel

Cognitive behavioural therapy reduces central sensitization Pain is not a simple sensory experience. Negative thoughts about the meaning of pain or unpleasant emotions like fear and depression can, in some cases, cause more suffering than the actual sensation. Psychological treatments like cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) target thoughts and … [Read more...]

Rethinking relationships between fear, avoidance and pain-related disability

Working as a physical therapist, I have sometimes struggled to understand why some of my patients with seemingly similar musculoskeletal injuries recover and why others develop chronic pain and disability. This question, as well as a range of others, ultimately prompted me to delve into the world of pain (research, that is) and explore how … [Read more...]

Everything you wanted to know about CENTRAL SENSITISATION

BiM review of a J Pain paper by Alban Latremoliere and Clifford J. Woolf (AKA L&W) By Kerwin Talbot & Lorimer Moseley Another of our series on the Journal of Pain’s most downloaded articles – this one on central sensitisation. There is no doubt that central sensitisation has such a prominent role in our pain lexicon that it almost … [Read more...]