What does current Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) rehabilitation look like?

As a practicing clinician I recognise that CRPS is notoriously difficult to treat. International clinical guidelines recommend rehabilitation therapies as a core treatment for CRPS (1,2,3). They suggest a very broad range of possible treatments with some variation across the guidelines. Despite these recommendations, a recent Cochrane review (4) of … [Read more...]

Editor’s picks: Clinical prediction rules: Use the babies and throw the bathwater?

Over this holiday season we are publishing our Editor’s picks of 2017 for you to read and enjoy again.  — There are easily a thousand clinical prediction rules (CPRs) related to managing musculoskeletal pain. Okay, maybe a thousand is an exaggeration. My point is there are many. All designed with the aim of helping clinicians to make more certain … [Read more...]

Editor’s picks: Pain after cancer: A new model for pain psychology?

Over this holiday season we are publishing our Editor’s picks of 2017 for you to read and enjoy again.  — What if every headache, every slight twinge in your back, was potentially life threatening? What if you couldn’t tell a brain tumour from coffee-withdrawal? These can be constant, niggling worries for many people who have survived cancer, and … [Read more...]

Editor’s picks: When pain kills – chronic pain and chronic diseases

Over this holiday season we are publishing our Editor’s picks of 2017 for you to read and enjoy again.  — One high profile campaign to raise awareness of persistent pain uses the tagline ‘persistent pain doesn’t kill, but it does ruin lives’. This is a fair argument, but recent data raise the possibility of an increased risk of death from other … [Read more...]

Editor’s picks: How does watching a parent in pain impact children’s own pain experiences?

Over this holiday season we are publishing our Editor’s picks of 2017 for you to read and enjoy again.  — Pain problems tend to run in families; if you have a parent with chronic pain you are also more likely to experience chronic pain yourself 1. While a simple explanation for this phenomenon is that parents and children share genetics that may … [Read more...]

Editor’s picks: Can preschool-age children reliably report the intensity of their pain?

Over this holiday season we are publishing our Editor’s picks of 2017 for you to read and enjoy again.  — From infancy onward, mammals express pain by vocalization, body movement, and facial actions. Such expression can communicate danger to others or elicit support. But these observable actions are not always specific to pain, and they diminish … [Read more...]

Editor’s picks – Embodied Pain: negotiating action

Over this holiday season we are publishing our Editor’s picks of 2017 for you to read and enjoy again. — We determine our world through the actions we take. Whether from the inside or out, our bodies provide us with the means to actively investigate our environment. This investigation is vital to survival. Active investigation enables us to … [Read more...]

Editors picks: Is alcohol effective as a painkiller?

Over this holiday season we are publishing our Editor’s picks of 2017 for you to read and enjoy again. The first one by Trevor Thompson is particularly seasonal! -- How many people have sustained an injury (accidental or other) after a few too many drinks, to find that the pain only really kicks in after they have sobered up? Pain experienced … [Read more...]

It’s nearly time for APS NZPS 2018 !

Do you like pain research? Do you want to know more about new advances in pain science? Of course you do! You are reading this blog after all!! We wanted to give you a head’s up on a great upcoming pain science meeting - the 2018 Australian Pain Society 38th and New Zealand Pain Society Conjoint Annual Scientific Meeting (APS NZPS 2018). This … [Read more...]

Exploring the management of painful diabetic neuropathy

We know that diabetes, and the complications that may accompany it, are becoming more common [1]. A World Health Organisation study looking at the Disability Adjusted Life Years for a range of diseases showed that globally diabetes has risen from 21st in 1990, to 14th in 2010; ischaemic heart disease was ranked 1st [2]. Painful diabetic neuropathy … [Read more...]