BodyInMind

BodyInMind looks at the relationship between the body, the brain and the mind and how they interact particularly in chronic and complex pain disorders.

First Year Success for the Local Pain Educator Program

After our 2018 Rural Outreach Tour from Sydney to Albury, Lorimer and the Pain Revolution crew put their heads together to work out a vision that would inspire the organisation to grow over the coming years. It's a huge ambitious vision; ALL Australians will have access to the knowledge, skills and local support to prevent and overcome … [Read more...]

Patient education: panacea, public relations, or path to better care for patients with low back pain?

Part 2 What should patient education involve? Clinical guidelines provide little detail on the what, where, and how long of patient education. There are common features on what should be included: advice to stay active, reassuring of a good prognosis, nothing seriously wrong. Unfortunately, there isn’t much more than that. We don’t, for example, … [Read more...]

Patient education: panacea, public relations, or path to better care for patients with low back pain?

Part 1 Should patient education be part of my treatment? Patient education gets physiotherapists so worked up! I am often surprised at how virulent discussions of patient education can become. “Nocebo language”—language that worsens pain– seems to be a major concern. “Words can harm!” Did you just use a pathoanatomic label for non-specific low … [Read more...]

Arts workshops as a space for pain communication

The second part  of the Communicating Chronic Pain project involved a series of arts workshops undertaken with participants with pain, their carers and interested clinicians [1] (for the first part go here). Qualitative research on pain experience has largely been based on interviews, and frequently emphasises that it is an isolating experience … [Read more...]

Visual Expressions of Chronic Pain on Social Media

If chronic pain is so difficult to communicate in language, what understanding might we gain from using methods that are not focused primarily on words? The Communicating Chronic Pain project examined non-textual modes of expressing chronic pain, looking at what visual, aural, tactile and other materials might offer for understanding the experience … [Read more...]

Aerobic exercise and pain perception in people with headache – what’s the latest?

Now the paper is actually called “Has aerobic exercise effect on pain perception in persons with migraine and co-existing tension-type headache and neck pain?  A randomised controlled, clinical trial” and I confess I did have to read the title several times to get my head around it, but I was instantly intrigued. What do we know about this? There … [Read more...]

Talking the talk: starting the conversation

As physios we spend much of the working day talking with patients (and colleagues!) and consider it one of our core skills, whatever field we work in. These interactions are unique and personal, and have the ability to make or break the outcome of any and every treatment.  If communication is the most important skill that health professionals have … [Read more...]

A Journey to Learn about Pain – a book about pain education for children

Persistent pain in children is an increasingly recognized clinical problem with high prevalence rates found in some populations. A conservative estimate posits that 20% to 35% of children and adolescents are affected by persistent pain worldwide (1). The most commonly reported pain problems in children and adolescents are headache; abdominal pain; … [Read more...]

The disconnect between tissue pathology, load and pain: implications for clinicians

For at least two decades, we have known that for chronic pain conditions there is discrepancy between tissue damage seen on clinical imaging and clinical presentation. You can have a severely osteoarthritic X-ray with no pain, or a completely normal X-ray with severe pain. Despite this disparity, imaging findings, such as meniscal tears, rotator … [Read more...]

How does prolonged experimental back pain alter measures of pain inhibition and facilitation?

Facilitation of central pain mechanisms is proposed to be a potential missing link between identifiable tissue damage and the severity of pain experienced across a range of painful conditions [1]. Clinically, it is purported to manifest as widespread hyperalgesia, due to impaired descending nociceptive inhibition and enhanced nociceptive … [Read more...]