BodyInMind

BodyInMind looks at the relationship between the body, the brain and the mind and how they interact particularly in chronic and complex pain disorders.

Can we use mobile devices for left/right judgement tasks?

The left/right judgment task (LRJT)[1] is enjoying popularity in clinical practices to assess and manage people with persistent pain. The LRJT has compelling theoretical underpinnings that have been tested in many painful [e.g. 2-5] and some non-painful conditions [e.g. 6-8]. LRJT software was initially created to be used on desktop computers, … [Read more...]

What does high value care for musculoskeletal pain look like?

A middle aged patient with slow onset shoulder pain was concerned about the results of a left shoulder ultrasound that showed a partial tear in her rotator cuff. Since the result she had taken to wearing a sling to protect the shoulder from “further tearing”. A patient with a three year history of work related, disabling low back pain, and a … [Read more...]

Breaking it, Faking it and Making it to the World Championships

Dan Van Der Laan has been a trusted Ride Guide and supporter of Pain Revolution for the past two Rural Outreach Tours.  Here is his story: Ever since I was a kid two things have been true. I have loved sport and competition and I have had an uncanny ability to get injured. These things remain. I need a competitive outlet and I have visited … [Read more...]

An incongruent answer to the incongruence theory

Around 20 years ago, researchers started asking questions about the relationship between sensorimotor incongruence (SMI) and chronic non-specific pain conditions. Initially the relationship was raised within the framework of phantom limb pain, but since cortical reorganisation was also present in people with other types of chronic pain (e.g., … [Read more...]

Do physiotherapists effectively deliver psychological interventions?

Many of you will be asking why this topic? I had an accident in 2012 where I was diagnosed with whiplash/fibromyalgia. I tried physiotherapy and conventional medicine, all the while my health deteriorated. After two years, I added meditation to my physical therapy routine, and by 2015, I had fully recovered physically and mentally. This experience … [Read more...]

Do you want to give a little love back our way?

If you are new to BodyInMind.org, you might not be aware of a major community outreach initiative being driven by our Chief Editor Professor Lorimer Moseley, called Pain Revolution. Pain Revolution emerged a couple of years ago on the back of two observations that will probably not be all that novel to you, but, both taken together, seemed pretty … [Read more...]

Poor functional outcomes in pediatric chronic pain – what’s catastrophizing got to do with it?

Catastrophizing has long been implicated in many poor outcomes in chronic pain-related conditions in both adults and children [3,4,11,12,14,15,18,20,22,24,29]. Scholars have called for interventions to reduce catastrophizing in children with chronic pain with the hope of improving outcomes [1,16,36]. However, important unanswered questions remain … [Read more...]

Extending scope of practice – physiotherapists’ perceptions of managing non-specific low back pain

There is considerable evidence demonstrating the multi-dimensional nature of non-specific low back pain (NSCLBP)[1], and recent guidelines and mission statements recommend a broad bio-psychosocial (BPS) approach to NSCLBP [2,3]. However, despite growing awareness of the value of embedding psychosocial factors into clinical practice recent studies … [Read more...]

Using the Internet to deliver Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for chronic pain

Cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) can improve quality of life and functioning in people with chronic pain. However, many people cannot access CBT in a timely manner, or at all. Simply put, there are too few psychologists with adequate training in pain management. There are also practical barriers to engaging in CBT, such as distance, work, and … [Read more...]

Does pain lead to mental illness or is it the other way around?

It’s common knowledge that pain problems and mental illness will affect many of us over the course of our lives [1-4]. Comorbidity between pain and mental illness is often seen in clinical practice and is well established in the literature [5]. But what actually comes first, is it the pain or is it the mental illness? And could it even be that one … [Read more...]